Archive | Events

Summer Work Program

Want to spend your summer working and traveling in Germany? SWP places first-, second-, and third-year students in internships with leading German companies and institutions. SWP is your ticket to improve your German language skills, build your resumé and professional network, and discover Europe!
Attend our Fall Information Session for an overview of the program and application process, and to hear from returning SWP alums about their internships in…

Arts & Culture
Banking, Finance & Economics
Energy & Environment
Government & Public Policy
Medicine & Healthcare
STEM Research & Industry …and more.

November 1st, 2018 – Online Application due
December 1st, 2018 – Interview and Supporting Materials due

For details and online application: How to apply
Or contact swp@princeton.edu

SWP Program Cover Artwork

“I can’t go on, I’ll go on.” The Problem of Narrative Continuity in Goethe’s Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre

Thursday Nov 15 @ 4:30pm
Helmut Müller-Sievers
Center for Humanities and the Arts; Dept. of Germanic & Slavic Languages
& Literatures, University of Colorado at Boulder

“I can’t go on, I’ll go on.” The Problem of Narrative Continuity in Goethe’s Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre

How do novels generate in the reader the expectation that the story they tell goes on, from page to page, chapter to chapter, book to book? How do they negotiate the division imposed by the book market and the demands of the genre? And what conception of continuity is involved in the novelistic enterprise? This paper takes Goethe’s Wilhelm Meister’s Lehrjahre (1796-96) as an example to highlight some of the philosophical implications of modern narratives, and to outline a practice of interpretation that pays attention to visual and technical material.
 

    

Princeton University
German Department
Fall 2018 Lecture Series
Curated by Thomas Y. Levin & Johannes Wankhammer

All lectures will take place in East Pyne 205, followed by a reception in East Pyne 207.
Unless otherwise noted they will be given in English and are free and open to the public.

Schubertiade: An Evening of Song, Stories, and Philosophy

December 1st, 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
East Pyne, Chancellor Green Rotunda

“But courage! Perhaps there exists a kindred spirit who will hear the tunes behind my words and give them back to me.” —Wilhelm Müller, Poet of Schubert’s Song Cycles (1815)

The Princeton Chamber Music Society and friends explore the dynamic relationship between music and text in the songs of Franz Schubert. Through an interdisciplinary program of performance and scholarship, the musicians of PCMS and PhD candidate Rachel Bergmann (Department of Comparative Literature) present an aesthetic and political history of Schubert’s reinvention of song, including its reverberations in our own time.

Schubertiade painting by Schubert’s friend Moritz von Schwind

(Image: the famous Schubertiade painting by Schubert’s friend Moritz von Schwind with Johann Michael Vogl and Schubert at the piano and friends gathered around.)

Images and Objects in Modern Europe’s Second Workshop with Alice Goff

Speaker: Alice Goff
Location: Julis Romo Rabinowitz, Room 201
Date: Friday, November 16, from 12–1:20 pm (light lunch served)

Speaker Bio
Alice Goff is Assistant Professor of German History and the College at the University of Chicago. Her research and teaching center on the history of art in political life within German states and on the relationship between Germany and the world. She is currently at work on a book project, The God Behind the Marble: Transcendence and the Object in the German Aesthetic State, about the French looting of German art collections during the Napoleonic Wars and its aftermath in Prussian cultural politics during the Post-Napoleonic period. She received her PhD in History from the University of California, Berkeley in 2015.

RSVP
To facilitate active discussion, the workshop will be capped at 25 people. Please email Hannah Stamler, hstamler@princeton.edu, by November 13 if you would like to attend.

Co-Sponsored by the Department of German

Artwork of vase, fruit with text about upcoming events of Images and Objects

“An Evening of Paper-Cutting”

Being Human 2018: A Festival of the Humanities
November 26, 2018
Time: 6:15 pm
Collaboration with the Humanities Council

Sonja Andersen, a graduate student in the Department of German at Princeton, has collaborated with the Humanities Council and “Being Human 2018: A Festival of the Humanities” to offer the community a free workshop on paper-cutting. Learn about the evolution of this ancient art form, as well as how to cut paper into artworks with artist, Dan Landau, on November 26, 2018 at 6:15 p.m. in a free class at Labyrinth Books in Princeton, N.J. Participants will receive paper-cutting tools, templates and hands-on instruction in this intimately sized class.

The event is free and open to all community members aged 16+ but space is limited, and participants must register online with Everbrite.

The evening’s program will feature a brief conversation about the history of paper-cutting by Andersen, followed by a paper-cutting demonstration and tutorial by Landau.

“The research that I do about the seventeenth century has implications today,” says Andersen. “Paper was precious then, and even little scraps were saved for use in paper-cutting art. The simplicity and elegant economy of paper-cutting has attracted artists defiant of the mainstream; one thinks of Lotte Reiniger’s Scherenschnitte animation and Kara Walker’s striking silhouettes. It’s an unexpectedly powerful medium.” Andersen is currently writing a dissertation on seventeenth-century literature and media.

“Papercutting is a zen-like experience that requires patience and focus,” says Landau. “It’s very relaxing and provides the perfect antidote to our current atmosphere of buzzing screens.”

Combining the art disciplines of drawing and papercutting, Landau creates detailed artworks by drawing on paper roadmaps and then cutting out the empty spaces around the drawing and the roads with a craft knife. Focusing primarily on portraits, his work is characterized by intricate paper-cut details and bold ink drawings. Landau lives in Bridgewater, N.J. See Landau’s art and creation process at www.DanLandau.net.

For more information, email Sonja Andersen at sonjaa@princeton.edu. Labyrinth Books is located at 122 Nassau Street, Princeton, N.J. Labyrinth is an acclaimed independent bookstore for engaged readers.

Entropy and Constructed Worlds: Paul Kammerer’s “Law of the Series”

Thursday Dec 6 @ 4:30pm
Kirk Wetters
Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures,
Yale University

Entropy and Constructed Worlds: Paul Kammerer’s “Law of the Series”

Austrian biologist Paul Kammerer’s controversial 1919 work Das Gesetz der Serie argues for a privileged ontological and epistemological status of anomalies, claiming that so-called “coincidences” reflect an underlying universal principle of the series that always reflects ordered lawfulness, regularity, and cohesion. This talk argues that Kammerer’s “series” may function better in constructed or literary worlds, which are premised on the idea that every anomaly and ambiguity can be recuperated as meaningful or symbolic. Reinterpreted as a hermeneutic-philological model, Kammerer’s law may thus prove useful as a sourcebook for “ways of worldmaking” (N. Goodman) – i.e., for designing and understanding rule-based constructed worlds.

 

Feuersalamander, Salamandra Maculosa, Image #13 in Das Gesetz der Serie (1919)


 

Princeton University
German Department
Fall 2018 Lecture Series
Curated by Thomas Y. Levin & Johannes Wankhammer

All lectures will take place in East Pyne 205, followed by a reception in East Pyne 207.
Unless otherwise noted they will be given in English and are free and open to the public.

Berlin in Film – Sonnen Allee

Department of German Film Series “Berlin in Film” presents:
October 18, 2018 @ 7:30 – 9:30pm
East Pyne 010

Michael is a teenager coming of age in 1970s East Berlin. He and his friends daily traverse Sonnenallee, a street bisected by the West Berlin border, an ever-present reminder of a free world just beyond the wall. The teens rebel against their insular communist surroundings by immersing themselves in contraband rock records and other forms of pop art. What is at first a fad becomes a lifesaver as each kid comes to face the crushing realities of impending adulthood.

Snacks and soft drinks provided.

Gendered Objects: Literarische Ding- und Geschlechtercodierungen im 19. Jahrhundert

Monday Oct 22 @ 4:30pm
Ulrike Vedder
Institut für deutsche Literatur, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

Gendered Objects: Literarische Ding- und Geschlechtercodierungen im 19. Jahrhundert

Masculine or feminine, sexual or asexual, normative or queer – gender-codes condense themselves in objects, just as gendered objects in turn affect the subjects who interact with them. From the fetish to the interior to the souvenir to the accessoire, the things of literary history are systematically gendered; the literary history of objects is thus also the history of the renegotiation of gender. The lecture draws out this connection with reference to the texts of Adalbert Stifter, Theodor Storm, and Herman Melville, and others.
The lecture will be held in German.
 

Victorian Human Hair Mourning Ring


 

Princeton University
German Department
Fall 2018 Lecture Series
Curated by Thomas Y. Levin & Johannes Wankhammer

All lectures will take place in East Pyne 205, followed by a reception in East Pyne 207.
Unless otherwise noted they will be given in English and are free and open to the public.

What is Psychoanalysis? A Philological Speculation

Speaker(s): Marcus Coelen, Visiting Professor, Psychoanalytic Studies Program, Columbia University
Wed, Nov 7, 2018
Time: 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm
Location: East Pyne 127

This Lecture is sponsored by the Department of Comparative Literature and co-sponsored by the Council of the Humanities, the Department of French & Italian, and the Department of German

Berlin in Film – Goodbye Lenin

Department of German Film Series “Berlin in Film” presents:
Goodbye Lenin

Sept 27, 2018 @ 7:30pm – 9:30pm
East Pyne 010

In 1990, to protect his fragile mother from a fatal shock after a long coma, a young man must keep her from learning that her beloved nation of East Germany as she knew it has disappeared.