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Prof. Inka Mülder-Bach (LMU-Munich) Teaching Graduate and Undergraduate Classes this Fall

Inka Mülder-Bach

Inka Mülder-Bach


Professor Inka Mülder-Bach, one of three Permanent Visiting Professors on the German Department faculty, will be in Princeton for the Fall semester teaching a graduate seminar (GER 512) entitled “Transformations of the Novel: Goethe’s Wilhelm Meister”, and an undergraduate class (GER 303) on “Literary Case Studies.”

Prof. Mülder-Bach’s description of the graduate seminar, which will take place on Wednesdays, 1:30-4:20pm, reads as follows:

While the 19th century canonized Goethe’s seminal novel Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre (1795/96) as the paradigmatic “Bildungsroman” of German literature recent scholarship has rediscovered it as part of an open-ended literary project. Published six years after the French revolution Goethe’s novel reacts to the violent political, economical and cultural transformations of the age with a narrative of conflicts, illusions, crises, losses and transitions that transforms the genre of the novel itself. The course will study these transformations in the light of the novel’s immediate precursors and its critical reception in romanticism.

Regarding the undergraduate class, which will be taught on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons from 3-4:20pm and will focus on works by Schiller, Kleist, Büchner, Kafka, Döblin and Musil, Prof. Mülder-Bach writes:

Since their emergence in the age of the Enlightenment, literary case studies have served as a genre which measures and weighs rules against exceptions, society against the individual, general norms against particular instances and thus implicitly negotiates the function of literature and its relation to normative and epistemological systems. The course will deal with narrative case studies and examine their development from the 18th to the 20th century.

Prof. Mülder-Bach received her PhD from the University of Tübingen after academic training at Tübingen, Oslo, and Berkeley. Before joining the Institute of German Philology at Ludwig Maximilian Universität (LMU) in Munich, where she has been since 1998, she held positions at the Freie Universität and the Zentrum für Literaturforschung in Berlin. Professor Mülder-Bach has been a visiting professor at Columbia University, New York, the IFK, Vienna, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf, and NYU.

Inka Mülder-Bach is a Vertrauensdozentin der Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes. In 2008-09 and 2010-11, Mülder-Bach held an LMU Excellence-in-Research professorship, and from 2009-2010, she served as vice president of the LMU. She is the editor of the works of Siegfried Kracauer and co-editor of Poetica.

Professor Mülder-Bach’s research focuses on German literature from the 18th to the 20th century in a comparative perspective, traditions of aesthetics and poetics, theories or narration, scenes of origins and constructions of the beginning of modernity, and Robert Musil.

New Departmental Officers for AY 2013-2014

With the start of the new academic year, there have been some staffing changes in the department. Thomas Y. Levin will be Acting Chair for the year while Nikolaus Wegmann is on sabbatical leave in Germany; Sarah Pourciau has taken on the duties of Departmental Representative and Devin Fore will continue as Director of Graduate Studies. We extend a special welcome to Emily Barth, who joins the department as our new Events Coordinator. Further details and contact information about these and all members of the German Department’s community can be found under the “People” menu on the departmental website.

Prof. Michael Saman Joins Faculty as Lecturer for AY13-14

410CA818-3156-E011-8B96-000C293A51F7Prof. Michael Saman will join the Princeton German Department as a Lecturer this Fall. Saman did his undergrad training at Duke University (where he wrote his thesis with Fred Jameson) and then went on to do graduate work in Philosophy and Germanistik at the FU-Berlin and in German at Harvard University. His dissertation (directed by Peter Burgard with Peter Fenves and Oliver Simons) was on “Goethe as a Reader of Kant, 1788-1832: Judgment, Grace, and the Most Desirable Calling.” Prof. Saman has taught in the German Departments of the College of William & Mary, Brown University and, for the last two years, as the recipient of a prestigious ACLS New Faculty Fellowship in the German Department at UCLA. Besides the revision of his 2010 dissertation as a book entitled Peculiar Analogues’: Goethe As a Reader of Kant, Michael is also working on a volume entitled The Voice of Time: W.E.B. Du Bois and Classical German Thought which he describes as “a study of the incorporation of texts and ideas from Herder, Goethe, Schiller, Wagner, and Hegel in The Souls of Black Folk, focusing on the impact of German historicism on Du Bois’s political thought.” In the Fall term Saman will teach Ger207 “Society, Politics and Culture in Germany, 1890-1945” and an upper-level seminar, cross listed with African American Studies, Ger307/AAS307 “Race and Classical German Thought.”

Three Advanced Graduate Students Win Prestigious Fellowships

Alice R. Christensen is the recipient of a DAAD Doctoral Research Fellowship which she will spend at the Internationales Kolleg für Kulturtechnikforschung und Medienphilosophie (IKKM) of the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar.

Jeffrey Kirkwood has been awarded the prestigious Harold W. Dodds Fellowship for the 2013–2014 academic year which he will spend at Princeton finishing his dissertation on theories of continuity in psychophysical experimentation around 1900 and media-technological discourses on the psychological ramifications of early German cinema.

Hannah Hunter-Parker has received a Donald and Mary Hyde Fellowship for Research Abroad in the Humanities, in support of her dissertation research at the Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin during the 2013-2014 academic year.

Graduate Students from Zurich and Berlin Joining the Department as Research Collaborators

Ms. Jelena Rakin, a graduate student in the Film Studies Department of the University of Zurich, Switzerland, will spend the academic year 2013-2014 affiliated with the German Department as a Visiting Student Research Collaborator where she will work with Prof. Tom Levin on her dissertation “Filmfarbe 1895-1930. Asthetik, Materialitat, Diskurse der Moderne”[Film Color 1895-1930: Aesthetics, Materiality, Discourses of Modernity]. Ms. Rakin’s thesis explores the aesthetics of applied film color techniques (hand coloring, stencil, tinting and toning), examining the specificity of the use of color in film in the context of color in other visual media of the period, the connection between the aesthetic appreciation of film color and its materiality, and the nature of the production processes involved. Crucial to this project are the aesthetic categories used in different popular and academic discourses on color and their relevance to the attitudes and (normative) understandings of the relation of color to the moving image. These aspects are considered against the dynamic backdrop of modernity in which color was subject to revisions as material substance, cultural value category, and finally as an aesthetic phenomenon. Ms. Rakin’s sojourn as a VSRC is funded by a prestigious grant from the Schweizerischer Nationalfonds zur Forderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung.

Joining Ms. Rakin as Visiting Student Research Collaborators for the Fall 2013 semester are two graduate students from the Friedrich Schlegel Graduate School for Literary Studies (FSGS) at the Freie Universität Berlin. Ms. Eva Lieberich will be consulting with Prof. Sally Poor on her dissertation “Envy as an (Anti-) Social Emotion in High Medieval Narrative.” Based on the premise that envy is an emotion as well as a social situation, the thesis analyzes the relationship of the envier, the envied and the object of envy in the literary space of court and ultimately aims to describe the ways medieval conceptions of the emotion differ from modern narrations of envy and how these conceptions are linked to genre. Ms. Sakine Weikert will spend the Fall 2013 term in the German Department doing research for her dissertation ”Photographed Things in Contemporary Literature and Art“ which looks at the generic dissonances provoked by hybrid works combining textual and photographic elements. Ranging from late 1970’s experimental literature (Hubert Fichte, Einar Schleef) and conceptual art (Sophie Calle) to more recent author-artist collaborations (Thomas Demand and Botho Strauß) and a fictional auction catalog (Leanne Shapton), the project draws a historical line from modern to postmodern practices of thing-culture. The VSRC sojourns of both Ms. Weikert and Ms. Lieberich are being funded by Prof. Tom Levin’s multi-year Einstein Foundation grant.

New Books by Our Faculty

“Erst in der Form von Publikationen erreicht die moderne Wissenschaft autopoietische Anschluβfähigkeit. Publikationen sind gleichsam das Zahlungsmittel der Wissenschaft, das operative Medium ihrer Autopoiesis.” – Niklas Luhmann: Die Wissenschaft der Gesellschaft, p. 432

In short:

“Träger der Forschung bleibt die Publikation” – Niklas Luhmann, Die Gesellschaft der Gesellschaft, p. 785

2012


Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: The Sufferings of Young Werther: A New Translation by Stanley Corngold. New York: W.W. Norton and Company 2012.
Review by J.M. Coetzee in the New York Review of Books

Werther Sufferings Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: The Sufferings of Young Werther (Norton Critical Editions). Translated and Edited by Stanley Corngold. New York: W.W. Norton and Company 2012.

Contains: Christiane Frey and David Martyn: Doubling Werther (1774/1787)


Carolin Duttlinger, Ben Morgan, Anthony Phelan (Eds.): Walter Benjamins anthropologisches Denken. Freiburg: Rombach 2012.

Proceedings from the Oxford-Princeton Conference, “At the Crossroads of Magic and Positivism: Walter Benjamin and Anthropology”, Worcester College, Oxford, September 1 – 3, 2009.



Devin Fore: Realism after Modernism: The Rehumanization of Art and Literature. Cambridge: MIT Press 2012.


2011


Stanley Corngold & Ruth Gross: Kafka for the Twenty-First Century. Rochester: Camden House, 2011.



Monatshefte, Volume 103, Number 3, Fall 2011. Special Issue: Franz Kafka. Edited by Stanley Corngold & Michael W. Jennings.



Stanley Corngold & Benno Wagner: Franz Kafka: The Ghosts in the Machine. Evanston: Northwestern University Press 2011.



Walter Hinderer: Vom Gesetz des Widerspruchs: Über Heinrich von Kleist.Würzburg: Königshausen und Neumann 2011.



Joseph Vogl: On Tarrying. Translated by Helmut Müller-Sievers. London/Calcutta: Seagull Books 2011.

In Turkish: Vogl, Joseph: Tereddüt üzerine. İstanbul : Metis Yayınları, 2011.



Ulrich Breuer & Nikolaus Wegmann (Eds.): Athenäum. Jahrbuch der Friedrich Schlegel Gesellschaft. Paderborn, 2011.



Sabine Flach & Sigrid Weigel (Eds.): WissensKünste: Das Wissen der Künste und die Kunst des Wissens / The knowledge of the arts and the art of knowledge. Weimar: Vdg-Verlag 2011.



Daniel Weidner & Sigrid Weigel (Eds.): Benjamin-Studien 2. München: Fink 2011.



Theodore Ziolkowski: Gilgamesh among Us: Modern Encounters with the Ancient Epic. Ithaca: Cornell University Press 2011.



Peter Hacks: Senecas Tod. Kommentierte Werke in Einzelausgaben. Edited by Theodore Ziolkowski. Berlin: Aurora Verlag 2011.

Visiting Associate Professional Specialist Announced for Spring 2013

Harun Maye Picture

Harun Maye, Researcher and Lecturer in the Internationales Kolleg für Kulturtechnikforschung und Medienphilosophie (IKKM) at the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, has joined the Department of German as a Visiting Associate Professional Specialist for the spring of 2013. After graduating in German Philology, Philosophy and Political Science, he received his intellectual training in the DFG-Graduate School on Codification of Violence in Medial Transformations at the Berlin Humboldt-University. Focusing on the intersection of media and cultural communication, he was Researcher at the DFG-Collaborative Research Centre Media and Cultural Communication, jointly organized by the Universities of Cologne, Bonn and Aachen. His research and teaching focuses on German literary history, the history of terms and metaphors, cultural technologies and the history of reading. He is currently completing a book on the history of “skipping” and “zapping” as modes of reading. Recent publications are: “Einführung in die Kulturwissenschaft” (München 2011, Coeditor: Leander Scholz); “Die Hyäne. Lesarten eines politischen Tiers” (Zürich/Berlin 2010, Coeditor: Markus Krajewski); “Metapher Internet. Literarische Bildung und Surfen” (Berlin 2009, Coauthor: Matthias Bickenbach).

For more information please visit:
http://www.ikkm-weimar.de/Maye

Call for Applications: “Reveals: Seams, Scars, Thresholds, and Frames”

Call for Applications: “Reveals: Seams, Scars, Thresholds, and Frames”
Third Annual Princeton-Weimar Summer School for Media Studies
Weimar (Germany) June 15–22, 2013

The Princeton-Weimar Summer School for Media Studies – a collaboration between the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar (Internationales Kolleg für Kulturtechnikforschung und Medienphilosophie, IKKM) and Princeton University (German Department) – returns to Weimar in 2013 for a week-long engagement with the topos “Reveals: Seams, Scars, Thresholds, and Frames.” Hosted by the International Center for Research into Cultural Technologies and Media Philosophy (IKKM) in the historic Palais Dürckheim, it will run from June 15 through June 22, 2013 and will be directed by Thomas Y. Levin (Princeton) and Bernhard Siegert (Weimar).

Besides the directors the faculty will include: Eduardo Cadava (Princeton), Brigid Doherty (Princeton), Lorenz Engell (Weimar), Ute Holl (Basel), Helga Lutz (Erfurt), and Claus Pias (Lüneburg).

The Princeton-Weimar Summer School for Media Studies invites applications from outstanding doctoral candidates in media studies and related fields such as film studies, literary studies, philosophy, art history,
architecture, sociology, politics, the history of science and visual culture.

For further information please visit: http://german.princeton.edu/ssms/

Inka Mülder-Bach Joins Faculty as Permanent Visiting Professor

Inka Mülder-Bach

Professor Mülder-Bach received her PhD from the University of Tübingen after academic training at Tübingen, Oslo, and Berkeley. Before joining the Institute of German Philology at Ludwig Maximilian Universität (LMU) in Munich, where she has been since 1998, she held positions at the Freie Universität and the Zentrum für Literaturforschung in Berlin. Professor Mülder-Bach has been a visiting professor at Columbia University, New York, the IFK, Vienna, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf, and NYU.

Inka Mülder-Bach is a Vertrauensdozentin der Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes.

In 2008-09 and 2010-11, Mülder-Bach held an LMU Excellence-in-Research professorship, and from 2009-2010, she served as vice president of the LMU.
Professor Mülder-Bach is the editor of the works of Siegfried Kracauer and co-editor of Poetica.

Professor Mülder-Bach’s research focuses on German literature from the 18th to the 20th century in a comparative perspective, traditions of aesthetics and poetics, theories or narration, scenes of origins and constructions of the beginning of modernity, and Robert Musil.

Hent de Vries Joins German Faculty as a Visiting Professor

 

Hent de Vries

Professor Hent de Vries, Russ Family Chair in the Humanities and Director of the Humanities Center at Johns Hopkins University, is a Visiting Professor in the Council of the Humanities and a Stewart Fellow in the Department of German this fall.

Hent de Vries received his PhD in Philosophy of Religion from the University of Leiden in 1989. From 1993 to 2002 he held the Chair of Metaphysics and Its History in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Amsterdam), where he remains a Regular Visiting Professor of Systematic Philosophy and the Philosophy of Religion. He was a co-founder of the Amsterdam School for Cultural Analysis (ASCA), an interdisciplinary research institute with a graduate program, and served as the Director of its governing board (1994-98) and its Scientific Director (1998-2004).

Hent de Vries works at the borders of religion, philosophy and politics: his research fields include Modern European thought, the history and critique of metaphysics, philosophies of religion, political theologies, concepts of violence, as well as literature and temporality. At Princeton, Professor de Vries is teaching a seminar on the relationship between philosophy and literature through the lens of Martin Heidegger and Paul Celan and their meditations about time.