Tag Archives: Featured

The German Department is happy to announce a new book publication from Professor Joel Lande

Persistence of Folly challenges the accepted account of the origins of German theater by focusing on the misunderstood figure of the fool, whose spontaneous and impish jest captivated audiences, critics, and playwrights from the late sixteenth through the early nineteenth century. Lande expands the usual scope of literary historical inquiry, showing that the fool was not a distraction from attempts to establish a serious dramatic tradition in the German language. Instead, the fool was both a fixture on the stage and a nearly ubiquitous theme in an array of literary critical, governmental, moral-philosophical, and medical discourses, figuring centrally in broad-based efforts to assign laughter a proper time, place, and proportion in society.

Persistence of Folly reveals the fool as a cornerstone of the dynamic process that culminated in the works of Lessing, Goethe, and Kleist. By reorienting the history of German theater, Lande’s work shows that the highpoint of German literature around 1800 did not eliminate irreverent jest in the name of serious drama, but instead developed highly refined techniques for integrating the comic tradition of the stage fool.

Berlin in Film – Sonnen Allee

Department of German Film Series “Berlin in Film” presents:
October 18, 2018 @ 7:30 – 9:30pm
East Pyne 010

Michael is a teenager coming of age in 1970s East Berlin. He and his friends daily traverse Sonnenallee, a street bisected by the West Berlin border, an ever-present reminder of a free world just beyond the wall. The teens rebel against their insular communist surroundings by immersing themselves in contraband rock records and other forms of pop art. What is at first a fad becomes a lifesaver as each kid comes to face the crushing realities of impending adulthood.

Snacks and soft drinks provided.

Gendered Objects: Literarische Ding- und Geschlechtercodierungen im 19. Jahrhundert

Monday Oct 22 @ 4:30pm
Ulrike Vedder
Institut für deutsche Literatur, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

Gendered Objects: Literarische Ding- und Geschlechtercodierungen im 19. Jahrhundert

Masculine or feminine, sexual or asexual, normative or queer – gender-codes condense themselves in objects, just as gendered objects in turn affect the subjects who interact with them. From the fetish to the interior to the souvenir to the accessoire, the things of literary history are systematically gendered; the literary history of objects is thus also the history of the renegotiation of gender. The lecture draws out this connection with reference to the texts of Adalbert Stifter, Theodor Storm, and Herman Melville, and others.
The lecture will be held in German.
 

Victorian Human Hair Mourning Ring


 

Princeton University
German Department
Fall 2018 Lecture Series
Curated by Thomas Y. Levin & Johannes Wankhammer

All lectures will take place in East Pyne 205, followed by a reception in East Pyne 207.
Unless otherwise noted they will be given in English and are free and open to the public.

Berlin in Film – Lola Rennt

Department of German Film Series “Berlin in Film” presents:
Lola Rennt

Nov 14, 2018 @ 7:30pm – 9:30pm
East Pyne 010

Two-bit Berlin criminal Manni delivers some smuggled loot for his boss, Ronnie, but accidentally leaves the 100,000 mark payment in a subway car. Given 20 minutes to come up with the money, he calls his girlfriend, Lola, who sprints through the streets of the city to try to beg the money out of her bank manager father and get to Manni before he does something desperate.

 

Snacks and soft drinks provided.

“I can’t go on, I’ll go on.” The Problem of Narrative Continuity in Goethe’s Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre

Thursday Nov 15 @ 4:30pm
Helmut Müller-Sievers
Center for Humanities and the Arts; Dept. of Germanic & Slavic Languages
& Literatures, University of Colorado at Boulder

“I can’t go on, I’ll go on.” The Problem of Narrative Continuity in Goethe’s Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre

How do novels generate in the reader the expectation that the story they tell goes on, from page to page, chapter to chapter, book to book? How do they negotiate the division imposed by the book market and the demands of the genre? And what conception of continuity is involved in the novelistic enterprise? This paper takes Goethe’s Wilhelm Meister’s Lehrjahre (1796-96) as an example to highlight some of the philosophical implications of modern narratives, and to outline a practice of interpretation that pays attention to visual and technical material.
 

    

Princeton University
German Department
Fall 2018 Lecture Series
Curated by Thomas Y. Levin & Johannes Wankhammer

All lectures will take place in East Pyne 205, followed by a reception in East Pyne 207.
Unless otherwise noted they will be given in English and are free and open to the public.

Berlin in Film – Glück

Department of German Film Series “Berlin in Film” presents:
Glück

Dec 5th, 2018 @ 7:30pm – 9:30pm
East Pyne 010

Berlin prostitute Irina falls for homeless punk Kalle, though their fledgling romance is challenged when one of Irina’s clients dies suddenly, prompting Kalle to take drastic measures in order to protect the woman he loves. Based on a short story by author Ferdinand von Schirach.

Snacks and soft drinks provided.

Entropy and Constructed Worlds: Paul Kammerer’s “Law of the Series”

Thursday Dec 6 @ 4:30pm
Kirk Wetters
Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures,
Yale University

Entropy and Constructed Worlds: Paul Kammerer’s “Law of the Series”

Austrian biologist Paul Kammerer’s controversial 1919 work Das Gesetz der Serie argues for a privileged ontological and epistemological status of anomalies, claiming that so-called “coincidences” reflect an underlying universal principle of the series that always reflects ordered lawfulness, regularity, and cohesion. This talk argues that Kammerer’s “series” may function better in constructed or literary worlds, which are premised on the idea that every anomaly and ambiguity can be recuperated as meaningful or symbolic. Reinterpreted as a hermeneutic-philological model, Kammerer’s law may thus prove useful as a sourcebook for “ways of worldmaking” (N. Goodman) – i.e., for designing and understanding rule-based constructed worlds.

 

Feuersalamander, Salamandra Maculosa, Image #13 in Das Gesetz der Serie (1919)


 

Princeton University
German Department
Fall 2018 Lecture Series
Curated by Thomas Y. Levin & Johannes Wankhammer

All lectures will take place in East Pyne 205, followed by a reception in East Pyne 207.
Unless otherwise noted they will be given in English and are free and open to the public.

Princeton in Munich concludes another exciting summer session in Munich, Germany

Princeton in Munich, the German Department’s study abroad program, concludes another exciting summer session in Munich, Germany. The program combines intensive language instruction at the Goethe Institut with seminars on literature and culture lead by professors from Princeton University’s German Department.
Email pim@princeton.edu for information about the summer 2019 program.

German Summer Work Program turns 60!

SWP theater image
This summer, the German Summer Work Program (SWP) celebrates its 60th year connecting Princeton undergraduates with internships in German-speaking countries, now the oldest and largest international internship program of its kind at the University. Since its founding in 1958, SWP has stimulated interest among students in German language and culture and promoted transatlantic understanding. Beyond job training, the students’ experiences enrich their classrooms and communities, returning with greater language skills and new perspectives on some of the most pressing issues of the day. They create a more vibrant, more informed, and far more interesting campus, from which we in the German Department and the University benefit greatly.
 

Last summer saw one of the largest cohorts in the program’s recent history: 31 students successfully completed internships in Germany, with many visiting the country for the first time. From Berlin to Munich, Cologne to Göttingen, Essen to Ingolstadt and beyond, our students discovered new passions and built lasting connections. Students once again had the chance to perform meaningful work in a variety of fields, at universities, hospitals, and research labs, cultural institutions and major corporations, law firms and media organizations, and in the service of the state and federal government. Their work deepened long standing relationships at the Bundestag, the IFO Institute, the St. Joseph Hospital, the law firms dtb Rechtsanwälte and von Trott zu Solz Lammek, the non-profit Kulturfonds Frankfurt RheinMain, the TU-Darmstadt Energy Center, the refugee support program coordinated at the Hessen State Government, and the Jugend Museum Schöneberg and Museum Wiesbaden. Ruhr Fellowship recipients were well-represented this year, with three students accepted to its 2017 program. Students also pursued new opportunities, including internships at Microsoft and SAP, various Max Planck Institutes, the European Space Agency and the German Aerospace Center, and Exberliner magazine.
 
The program continues to benefit from the dedicated efforts of SWP Director David Fisher, Chair of the Princeton Alumni Association of Germany, who has secured support to provide modest scholarships for students with low- and unpaid internships. Students’ travel and immigration fees were again supported through the generous contribution of the Max Kade Foundation, without which the summer’s successes would not have been possible.
 
This coming summer, we look forward to supporting more unforgettable internship experiences; 25 students have been accepted to internships for Summer 2018. In addition, the feedback from last year led to the creation of unique opportunities for returning students, several of whom have since elected to major in German. We are committed to developing more internships in a wider range of fields, so that SWP can continue to benefit students in ways that are most meaningful to them—personally, professionally, academically—for years to come.
 
Read more about last summer’s internships, from the students themselves:

“Having access to the operating room is the most exhilarating thing I have ever experienced and it is an experience I will never forget, I can’t wait to be back in the operating room actually standing at the table!” Kerri Davidson, Class of 2019

“I loved my time in Germany and I am planning to apply to programs and companies that may allow me to return to Germany after graduation.” Marley Brackett, Class of 2018

“Overall, my internship and my two months in Wiesbaden were completely unparalleled in the quality of the language immersion, work experience, and overall cultural education I received.” Janice Cheon, Class of 2020

“I had a great time in Germany this summer! I definitely improved my German proficiency, and I got to experience German culture in a whole new way!” Jack Draper, Class of 2020

“My internship with a law firm was a great way to experience German culture — it was immersive, much more self-directed than a language program, and provided professional and intellectual experience in German reparations law that I will take with me after this program.” Sebastian Witherspoon, Class of 2019

“I already miss it. It was awesome!” Ekrem Ipek, Class of 2019

 
To learn more about the program and application requirements, please visit the SWP homepage on the German Department website, or check out the SWP Facebook Page @PrincetonGermanSWP.
 
For all other inquiries or to learn how to become involved as a future host organization or sponsor, contact SWP Assistant Director Hannah Hunter-Parker (swp@princeton.edu).

[Image credit: Heidelberg University Library, 141.1925, 0110]

2018 Summer School for Media Studies


Scaling. What happens when we scale things up or down?
Princeton-Weimar Summer School for Media Studies

June 16–22, 2018

The Princeton-Weimar Summer School for Media Studies -a collaboration between Bauhaus-Universität Weimar (Internationales Kolleg für Kulturtechnikforschung und Medienphilosophie, IKKM) and Princeton University (German Department)-returns to Princeton in 2018 for its eighth installment. The 2018 session will be devoted to the investigation of scale and scaling as operative concepts for the analysis of media. What happens when we scale? Does anything really change? Can scaling ever impact the inner blueprint of an object? Are there laws of scaling? Or does scaling resist any attempt at calculability, such that, to investigate it, we can only ever look at individual events of scaling? As a media practice, scaling is widely used. But, in contrast to the ubiquity of operations, scaling is hardly ever viewed on its own terms as a basic concept of media analysis. The Princeton-Weimar Summer School for Media Studies 2018 will attempt to map out approaches to scaling as a basic media-analytical tool.

The summer school will be directed by Bernhard Siegert (Weimar) and Nikolaus Wegmann (Princeton). The Princeton-Weimar Summer School for Media Studies invites applications from outstanding doctoral students throughout the world in media studies and related fields such as film studies, literary studies, philosophy, art history, architecture, sociology, politics, the history of science and visual culture.