Tag Archives: Featured

Schubertiade: An Evening of Stories, Philosophy, and Song

On December 1, the German Department joined the Princeton Chamber Music Society and PhD candidate Rachel Bergmann in the Chancellor Green Rotunda for Schubertiade: An Evening of Stories, Philosophy, and Song. Together with Bergmann (Department of Comparative Literature), singers Neel Nagarayan, Megan Ormsbee, Maddy Kushan, and Kevin Williams, and pianists Seho Young, John Hoffmeyer, Charlie Liu, and Chris Parton presented an interdisciplinary Liederabend integrating scholarship with performance in a program of ten songs. The first set explored the aesthetics of art song, the second the politics of Schubert’s innovations in Lied form in the context of his historical moment. Refreshments greeted performers and audience at intermission, in keeping with the festive and domestic origins of the Schubertiade tradition.

An unusual collaboration between graduate students and undergraduates, Schubertiade was co-sponsored with the Department of Comparative Literature.

Three students with Schubertiade Poster in East Pyne

Image: courtesy of J.Lande with left to right: John W. Hoffmeyer, Janice Cheon and Rachel J. Bergmann.

Topic Announced for the 2019 Summer School for Media Studies

The Technologization of Cultural Techniques.
What Happens When Practices Become Algorithmic Technologies?

Princeton-Weimar Summer School for Media Studies Internationales Kolleg für Kulturtechnikforschung und Medienphilosophie (Bauhaus-Universität Weimar)
German Department (Princeton University)
Weimar, Germany, June 22–29, 2019

The Princeton-Weimar Summer School for Media Studies – a collaboration between Bauhaus-Universität Weimar (Internationales Kolleg für Kulturtechnikforschung und Medienphilosophie, IKKM) and Princeton University (German Department) – returns to Weimar in 2019 for its ninth installment. At an historical moment marked by a shift from mass media to what could be described as the implementation of cultural techniques, the 2019 session will be devoted to the question what happens to concepts derived from cultural techniques – like writing, erasure, image, number, not to mention the concept of culture itself – when implemented by algorithmic routines that run on computers or mobile media and thus effectively become digitized cultural technologies.

The 2019 Princeton-Weimar Summer School for Media Studies – which will be directed by Thomas Y. Levin (Princeton) and Bernhard Siegert (Weimar) – will attempt to map out approaches to media as networks of cultural technologies. We invite applications from outstanding doctoral students throughout the world in media studies and related fields such as film studies, literary studies, philosophy, art history, architecture, sociology, politics, the history of science and visual culture.

All application materials should be sent via email to: ikkm-conference@uni-weimar.de and must be received no later than December 16th, 2018.

Coordinators:
Katharina Rein (Weimar), Elias Pitegoff (Princeton)
Please submit all inquiries to: ikkm-conference@uni-weimar.de

Further information regarding this year’s theme

Image credit:
Trevor Paglen
A Prison Without Guards (Corpus: Eye-Machines)
Adversarially Evolved Hallucination, 2017
Dye sublimation metal print
32 x 40 inches

The German Department is happy to announce a new book publication from Emeritus Stanley Corngold

Walter Kaufmann was a charismatic philosopher, critic, translator, and poet who taught with great success at Princeton from 1947 until his untimely death in 1980. He is mainly noted for his first book on Friedrich Nietzsche, whom he put under the head of “Dionysian Enlightenment” and set in motion a continuing, decades-long preoccupation with Nietzsche by American philosophers. Kaufmann declared that he had put his life and soul in the pages of his many books; in this intellectual biography, which Kirkus Reviews calls “luminous,” Stanley Corngold aims to preserve Kaufmann’s legacy.

Jacket Cover Walter Kaufmann Philospoher, Humanist, Heretic by Stanley Corngold

Summer Work Program

Want to spend your summer working and traveling in Germany? SWP places first-, second-, and third-year students in internships with leading German companies and institutions. SWP is your ticket to improve your German language skills, build your resumé and professional network, and discover Europe!
Attend our Fall Information Session for an overview of the program and application process, and to hear from returning SWP alums about their internships in…

Arts & Culture
Banking, Finance & Economics
Energy & Environment
Government & Public Policy
Medicine & Healthcare
STEM Research & Industry …and more.

November 1st, 2018 – Online Application due
December 1st, 2018 – Interview and Supporting Materials due

For details and online application: How to apply
Or contact swp@princeton.edu

SWP Program Cover Artwork

The German Department is happy to announce a new book publication from Professor Joel Lande

Persistence of Folly challenges the accepted account of the origins of German theater by focusing on the misunderstood figure of the fool, whose spontaneous and impish jest captivated audiences, critics, and playwrights from the late sixteenth through the early nineteenth century. Lande expands the usual scope of literary historical inquiry, showing that the fool was not a distraction from attempts to establish a serious dramatic tradition in the German language. Instead, the fool was both a fixture on the stage and a nearly ubiquitous theme in an array of literary critical, governmental, moral-philosophical, and medical discourses, figuring centrally in broad-based efforts to assign laughter a proper time, place, and proportion in society.

Persistence of Folly reveals the fool as a cornerstone of the dynamic process that culminated in the works of Lessing, Goethe, and Kleist. By reorienting the history of German theater, Lande’s work shows that the highpoint of German literature around 1800 did not eliminate irreverent jest in the name of serious drama, but instead developed highly refined techniques for integrating the comic tradition of the stage fool.

The German Department is happy to announce a new book publication from Emeritus Ted Ziolkowski

Because of Romanticism’s vast scope, most treatments have restricted themselves to single countries or to specific forms,
notably literature, art, or music. This book takes a wider view by considering in each of six chapters representative examples of works — from across Europe and across a range of the arts — that were created in a single year. This approach by “stages” makes it possible to determine characteristics of six stages of Romanticism in its historical and intellectual context and to note the conspicuous differences between these stages as European Romanticism developed.

Book cover with spline and back jacket of Stages-of-European-Romanticism_Cover

Berlin in Film – Sonnen Allee

Department of German Film Series “Berlin in Film” presents:
October 18, 2018 @ 7:30 – 9:30pm
East Pyne 010

Michael is a teenager coming of age in 1970s East Berlin. He and his friends daily traverse Sonnenallee, a street bisected by the West Berlin border, an ever-present reminder of a free world just beyond the wall. The teens rebel against their insular communist surroundings by immersing themselves in contraband rock records and other forms of pop art. What is at first a fad becomes a lifesaver as each kid comes to face the crushing realities of impending adulthood.

Snacks and soft drinks provided.

Princeton in Munich concludes another exciting summer session in Munich, Germany

Princeton in Munich, the German Department’s study abroad program, concludes another exciting summer session in Munich, Germany. The program combines intensive language instruction at the Goethe Institut with seminars on literature and culture lead by professors from Princeton University’s German Department.
Email pim@princeton.edu for information about the summer 2019 program.

German Summer Work Program turns 60!

SWP theater image
This summer, the German Summer Work Program (SWP) celebrates its 60th year connecting Princeton undergraduates with internships in German-speaking countries, now the oldest and largest international internship program of its kind at the University. Since its founding in 1958, SWP has stimulated interest among students in German language and culture and promoted transatlantic understanding. Beyond job training, the students’ experiences enrich their classrooms and communities, returning with greater language skills and new perspectives on some of the most pressing issues of the day. They create a more vibrant, more informed, and far more interesting campus, from which we in the German Department and the University benefit greatly.
 

Last summer saw one of the largest cohorts in the program’s recent history: 31 students successfully completed internships in Germany, with many visiting the country for the first time. From Berlin to Munich, Cologne to Göttingen, Essen to Ingolstadt and beyond, our students discovered new passions and built lasting connections. Students once again had the chance to perform meaningful work in a variety of fields, at universities, hospitals, and research labs, cultural institutions and major corporations, law firms and media organizations, and in the service of the state and federal government. Their work deepened long standing relationships at the Bundestag, the IFO Institute, the St. Joseph Hospital, the law firms dtb Rechtsanwälte and von Trott zu Solz Lammek, the non-profit Kulturfonds Frankfurt RheinMain, the TU-Darmstadt Energy Center, the refugee support program coordinated at the Hessen State Government, and the Jugend Museum Schöneberg and Museum Wiesbaden. Ruhr Fellowship recipients were well-represented this year, with three students accepted to its 2017 program. Students also pursued new opportunities, including internships at Microsoft and SAP, various Max Planck Institutes, the European Space Agency and the German Aerospace Center, and Exberliner magazine.
 
The program continues to benefit from the dedicated efforts of SWP Director David Fisher, Chair of the Princeton Alumni Association of Germany, who has secured support to provide modest scholarships for students with low- and unpaid internships. Students’ travel and immigration fees were again supported through the generous contribution of the Max Kade Foundation, without which the summer’s successes would not have been possible.
 
This coming summer, we look forward to supporting more unforgettable internship experiences; 25 students have been accepted to internships for Summer 2018. In addition, the feedback from last year led to the creation of unique opportunities for returning students, several of whom have since elected to major in German. We are committed to developing more internships in a wider range of fields, so that SWP can continue to benefit students in ways that are most meaningful to them—personally, professionally, academically—for years to come.
 
Read more about last summer’s internships, from the students themselves:

“Having access to the operating room is the most exhilarating thing I have ever experienced and it is an experience I will never forget, I can’t wait to be back in the operating room actually standing at the table!” Kerri Davidson, Class of 2019

“I loved my time in Germany and I am planning to apply to programs and companies that may allow me to return to Germany after graduation.” Marley Brackett, Class of 2018

“Overall, my internship and my two months in Wiesbaden were completely unparalleled in the quality of the language immersion, work experience, and overall cultural education I received.” Janice Cheon, Class of 2020

“I had a great time in Germany this summer! I definitely improved my German proficiency, and I got to experience German culture in a whole new way!” Jack Draper, Class of 2020

“My internship with a law firm was a great way to experience German culture — it was immersive, much more self-directed than a language program, and provided professional and intellectual experience in German reparations law that I will take with me after this program.” Sebastian Witherspoon, Class of 2019

“I already miss it. It was awesome!” Ekrem Ipek, Class of 2019

 
To learn more about the program and application requirements, please visit the SWP homepage on the German Department website, or check out the SWP Facebook Page @PrincetonGermanSWP.
 
For all other inquiries or to learn how to become involved as a future host organization or sponsor, contact SWP Assistant Director Hannah Hunter-Parker (swp@princeton.edu).

[Image credit: Heidelberg University Library, 141.1925, 0110]

2018 Summer School for Media Studies


Scaling. What happens when we scale things up or down?
Princeton-Weimar Summer School for Media Studies

June 16–22, 2018

The Princeton-Weimar Summer School for Media Studies -a collaboration between Bauhaus-Universität Weimar (Internationales Kolleg für Kulturtechnikforschung und Medienphilosophie, IKKM) and Princeton University (German Department)-returns to Princeton in 2018 for its eighth installment. The 2018 session will be devoted to the investigation of scale and scaling as operative concepts for the analysis of media. What happens when we scale? Does anything really change? Can scaling ever impact the inner blueprint of an object? Are there laws of scaling? Or does scaling resist any attempt at calculability, such that, to investigate it, we can only ever look at individual events of scaling? As a media practice, scaling is widely used. But, in contrast to the ubiquity of operations, scaling is hardly ever viewed on its own terms as a basic concept of media analysis. The Princeton-Weimar Summer School for Media Studies 2018 will attempt to map out approaches to scaling as a basic media-analytical tool.

The summer school will be directed by Bernhard Siegert (Weimar) and Nikolaus Wegmann (Princeton). The Princeton-Weimar Summer School for Media Studies invites applications from outstanding doctoral students throughout the world in media studies and related fields such as film studies, literary studies, philosophy, art history, architecture, sociology, politics, the history of science and visual culture.