Jimena Canales


Jimena Canales is an Associate Professor at the Department of the History of Science at Harvard University. She specializes in the history and philosophy of the physical sciences. Areas of interests include epistemology, science and representation, and theories of modernity and postmodernity. Her recent book A Tenth of a Second: A History has been widely praised in scholarly reviews and journalistic forums. Canales has published on the history of architecture, film, relativity theory, and nineteenth and early twentieth-century science and philosophy. Some recent publications include: “Desired Machines: Cinema and the World in its Own Image,” Science in Context 24(2011), pp. 329–359. “A Science of Signals: Einstein, Inertia, and the Postal System,” Thresholds 39 (March 2011); “‘A Number of Scenes in a Badly Cut Film’: Observation in the Age of Strobe.” In Histories of Scientific Observation, ed. Lorraine Daston and Elizabeth Lunbeck (University of Chicago Press, 2011); “Einstein, Bergson, and the Experiment that Failed: Intellectual Cooperation at the League of Nations,” Modern Language Notes, 120 (2005); “Criminal Skins: Tattoos and Modern Architecture in the work of Adolf Loos,” Architectural History 48 (2005): 235-256.